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Curriculum Guide

2020-2021

 

Bon Homme High School

 

 Curriculum Guide Book

 

Bon Homme High School

 

Curriculum Guide Book Table of Contents

 

 

 

Mathematics Department……………………………………………………………………...p 3-4

 

English Department…………………………………………………………………………...p 4-6

 

Science Department…………………………………………………………………………...p 6-7

 

Social Science Department……………………………………………………………………p 7-8

 

Computer Department………………………………………………………………….…..p 9-10

 

Fine Arts Department………………………………………………………………….….  p 10-11

 

Business Department……………………………………………………………………….....p 11

 

Foreign Language Department………………………………………………………..………p 12

 

Technology Department……………………………………………………………………p 12-13

 

Agriculture Education Department…………………………………………………………p 13-14

 

Physical Education Department……………………………………………………………….p 15

 

2020 Graduation Requirement Check Off Chart……………………………………………...p 16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Descriptions

 

Elective classes offered in a given year depend upon class enrollment, scheduling/staff issues, and School Board approval. Due to these issues and individual student scheduling problems, students may not be able to take all the courses they sign up for. On this year’s registration forms, students are asked to list one additional class per semester as an alternative. Students will be mailed their schedules in August, and can request changes at that time. Students are asked to make changes before school starts, but they may drop and add classes through the first week of school.

 

Courses are organized by department. Classes worth 1/2 credit are one semester and those marked 1 credit are year-long courses, unless otherwise stated. The credits possible are marked on the top, along with the grade level which the class is offered. Classes marked with an R are open to other grades but recommended at the labeled grade level. Courses may be taken only once for credit unless otherwise stated.  

 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT

 

 8th grade Algebra I may be used for high school graduation requirement- provided the student maintains an 85% average for both semesters.  Students are required to take end-of-semester exams.  Students are required to take two or three credits of math depending on their graduation date.

                                                                                                                                               

Algebra I 1 credit (R 8-9)

 

Algebra I is intended as a freshman course to help students prepare for advanced high school math and science courses as well as to help the student meet requirements for entrance into state colleges and universities. Upperclassmen may also take this course as they decide on career goals.

 

The course emphasizes equation solving. It begins with an introduction to variables, grouping symbols, and simple equations. These concepts are then used to solve word problems and systems of equations. Other topics covered include the real numbers and operations on them, factoring polynomials, algebraic fractions, and graphing equations in a Cartesian plane.

 

Algebra II 1 credit (9-12) prerequisite Algebra I

 

Prerequisite is successful completion of Algebra I. May be taken prior to, after, or simultaneously with Basic Geometry.

 

The first two chapters will be a review of Algebra I topics. The remainder of the course will cover such topics as literal equations, systems of equations, factoring polynomials, radicals, complex numbers, and quadratic functions.

 

Accelerated Algebra II 1 credit (9-12) prerequisite Algebra I

 

Students enrolling in this course need to have completed Algebra I with a final average of B- (or above).

 

This course picks up immediately where Algebra I left off, covering some of the same topics but in much greater depth. Topics covered will include literal equations, systems of equations, factoring polynomials, radicals, complex numbers, quadratic functions, logarithms, series and sequences, and probability.

 

Geometry 1 credit (10-12) prerequisite Algebra I

 

Prerequisite is successful completion of Algebra I. May be taken prior to, after, or simultaneously with Basic Algebra II. 

 

Topics covered include basic informal and formal proofs, parallel lines, perpendicular lines, congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, similar polygons, ratios, proportions, the Pythagorean Theorem, circles, areas and volumes of geometric figures, transformations, and vectors.

 

 

 

 

Accelerated Geometry 1 credit (10-12) prerequisite Accelerated Algebra II (and Algebra I)

 

Prerequisites are successful completion of Algebra I and Accelerated Algebra II.

 

The first semester is devoted to two-column proofs using the deductive method. Proofs studied consist of parallel lines, perpendicular lines, congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, similar polygons, ratios, proportions, and the Pythagorean Theorem.  Other topics covered include circles, areas and volumes of plane and solid geometric figures, coordinate geometry, transformations, logic, and geometric constructions.

 

Pre-Calculus 1 credit (11-12) prerequisite Accelerated Geometry and Accelerated Algebra II

 

Students enrolling in this course should have completed Honors Algebra II and Honors Geometry. These honors courses are specifically designed to prepare students for success in Pre-Calculus. Topics covered include algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions, exploring and graphing higher order equations as applied to real-world situations, applications of trigonometric functions, Laws of Sine and Cosine, sequence and series, and recursive functions.

 

Advanced Placement Calculus 1 credit (12) prerequisite Pre-Calculus

 

This course will prepare students to take the AP Calculus exam. Students will have the opportunity to, but are not required to take the AP exam. Students will have to pay the exam fee, and college credits may be earned according to the student’s score and specific university entrance policies. Topics covered in this class include limits, differentiation methods, and applications, increasing and decreasing functions, concavity of functions, integration methods and applications, logarithmic and exponential functions.  There will be extensive use of TI 89 Plus Silver Edition graphing calculators incorporated into the class.  Although it is not a requirement, it is strongly advised that each student purchase his/her own calculator. 

 

 

English Department

 

Four credits of English are required for graduation: English I, English II, English III or AP English III, and English IV or AP English IV. All other courses are electives.

 

Novels ½ credit (10-12) prerequisite of at least a  B- in Freshman Literature

 

This course will meet for one semester, and is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who enjoy reading and analyzing literature. The class will provide an opportunity to expand a student's exposure to significant literary works from the classics through the modern age. Studies will focus on novels of various eras and genres that may not be covered in English II, III, and IV. Those works may include, but are not limited to types such as Science Fiction, Fantasy, Modern Literature, as well as classic works from a variety of literary and historical periods.  Course projects will include, but are not limited to: note taking, tests, quizzes, written responses, class participation, and projects. This class will count as an elective credit.

 

Novels II ½ credit (11-12) Prerequisite is Novels

 

This course will meet for one semester, and is open to anyone who successfully completed Novels I.. The class will provide an opportunity to extend the student’s exposure to literature beyond that explored in Novels I and in other required English classes. Those works may include, but are not limited to, such types as Science Fiction, Fantasy, Modern literature, as well as classic works from a variety of literary and historical periods. Course projects will include, but will not be limited to: note taking, tests, quizzes, written responses, class participation, and projects. Critical analysis will be incorporated. The class will count as an elective credit.

 

Creative Writing ½ credit (10-12) Prerequisites are Speech and Freshman Literature

 

This semester long elective class is intended for and functions as a broad-based introduction to various forms of writing, such as short fiction, poetry, and drama. Students also experiment with writing these genres. The class is usually comprised of technique and style discussions, reading assignments and writing exercises. Students are introduced to the concept of writing workshop, wherein they share pieces with peers in order to give and receive feedback. Editing and peer reviewing techniques will also be an integral part of the writing process. This class counts as .5 credits of an elective.

                                                                                                                                                  

English I 1 credit (R 9)

 

Speech: Semester 1

The required course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to acquire lifelong communication skills through writing, speaking, and listening experiences; to acquire and apply knowledge of technology in research for speaking and communicating; to develop insight into self and others though speaking situations; and to increase the scope of knowledge and use of skill in grammar usage and vocabulary usage. Formal speaking experiences are emphasized. Research skills, using MLA formatting, will be introduced and utilized throughout the class. Students also begin development of a Portfolio File of language arts and communications accomplishments. This portfolio tracks each student's progress until the end of his/her senior year.

 

Lit/Comp: Semester 2 (Freshman Literature)

Freshman Lit/Comp completes the English I requirement with English I: Speech. Lit/Comp introduces students to high school-level studies in literature and requires students to read with insight and analysis. Students collect, revise and analyze their written work utilizing the writing process. Research skills will continue to be honed through credible and authentic research. It is expected that the students entering Freshman English Studies have mastered basic writing and reading skills (i.e., comprehension, grammar, sentence and paragraph writing skills.) The Portfolio File will be updated at the end of the semester.

                                                                                                                                                 

English II 1 credit (R -10)

 

In this required course the Student will develop skills of decoding, analysis, critical thinking and application through the study of a variety of works of literature. They will learn to develop discussions and problem solving skills in large and small group situations. Each student will work on writing skills of formal essay response, informal reader’s response, reader’s logs, research writing and creative writing. Formal and informal speaking and listening skills in large and small group situations will be developed. We will work to increase awareness of cultural diversity as it applies to literature and speaking experiences. By expanding his/her range of literature, speaking and listening, the student should gain increased insight into his/her relationship with the past, present, and future.  Students will continue to revise and expand his/her Portfolio File.

 

English III 1 credit (R-11)

 

English III is a study of American works and the works of related themes, which reflect the history and varied culture of America. This course will fulfill the requirement for American Literacy and Composition studies and will help the student recognize and appreciate the varied cultural heritage of America and its literature. The students will respond to literary, written, and visual depictions of American works through comparative, critical, analytical analysis, discussion, and group projects. They will continue to develop skills in research necessary to appreciate and share concepts in writing. The scope of understanding American literary works will be broadened.  Writing formulas including, but not limited to Descriptive Narrative, Process Analysis, Cause and Effect, Compare and Contrast, Problem Solution, Persuasion and Argument will be explored and developed. Portfolio Files will be updated.

 

Advanced Placement English III 1 credit (11- in place of required English III)

 

This class will fulfill the requirement for American Language and Composition studies and will cover the material listed above in the English III class. Additional reading and writing assignments will be presented to challenge the college bound student. Students wishing to enter this class students must have a desire to cover the subject in greater depth to better prepare them for their college career. Placement will be determined by teacher recommendation and grades in previous English courses. Students may choose to pay for and take the national AP Language and Composition English exam for college credits.  Portfolio Files will be updated.

                                                                                                                 

English IV 1 credit (R-12)

 

Senior Literature incorporates the study of world literature, contemporary works and classics, with developmental composition skills appropriate to a variety of post-secondary choices. Seniors may elect this course or the Advanced Placement Literature and Composition course to fulfill the senior English IV requirement. Students will participate in individual and collaborative learning projects, and will apply clear writing and speaking skills in class discussions, written work, and evaluative commentary. Students will engage in practical research and will explore a variety of presentational skills. Students will be encouraged to develop the skills of self-assessment through the use of developmental writing portfolios.

 

Advanced Placement English IV 1 credit (12- in place of required English IV)

 

Advanced Placement English IV is offered to those students who want to experience a challenging course designed to parallel a college-level literature and composition course. The advanced reading and writing assignments, and the design of the course as a seminar discussion, prepares students who so wish to take the College Board Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Exam, given yearly in May. Students typically read 9-10 major classic works, write college-level essays which are scored holistically, develop and discuss questions which parallel deep critical thinking, and track their thinking process through the extensive use of response journals. Seniors who elect this Advanced Placement English IV option are not required to take the AP exam. If a student wishes to take the exam and try for college credits, the school will administer it. Students taking the exam are responsible for the exam fee. Students will participate in individual and collaborative learning projects, and will apply clear writing and speaking skills in class discussions, written work, and evaluative commentary.

 

Science Department

 

Three credits of a lab science are currently required for graduation. Biology is required for graduation. Four credits are required for acquisition of Board of Regents Diploma/Opportunity Scholarship.

                                                                                                                               

Biology 1 credit (R-10)

 

This course is required of all freshmen. The course is a lab science that covers two major areas; a study of basic biological principles, and a study of the kingdoms. The kingdoms are studied from the simplest to the most complex in structure. Microscope work is used as time permits. In Zoology, several dissections are done. Area field trips are taken as time permits.

                                             

Functional Chemistry (Advanced Chemistry) 1 credit (10-12) prerequisite: successful completion of Biology

 

This Course serves as an introduction to those chemistry skills and knowledge that will be encountered in beginning college chemistry. There will be considerable laboratory work coordinated with the textbook material. The metric system will be used throughout the year. Math skills are extremely important and it is recommended that students have at least two years of Algebra before taking chemistry. Many of the skills covered in the first semester of physical science are developed in greater depth, such as: formula writing and naming, equation writing and balancing, and use of the periodic table. More advanced topics concerning solutions, carbon compounds, and reaction mechanisms and rate will be covered as time permits.

 

Conceptual Chemistry 1 credit (10-12) prerequisite: Biology

 

This course serves to enhance chemistry skills and knowledge that might be applied to everyday life. Following a semester of basic chemistry concepts, such as atomic bonding and compound naming, subjects such as reaction chemistry, phase change, solution chemistry, and nuclear chemistry will be explored. The metric system will be used throughout the year. Math skills are extremely important and it is recommended that students have at least two years of Algebra before taking chemistry. Many of the skills covered in the first semester of physical science are developed in greater depth, such as: formula writing and naming, equation writing and balancing, and use of the periodic table. More advanced topics concerning solutions, carbon compounds, and reaction mechanisms and rate will be covered as time permits.       

 

Functional Physics 1 credit (11-12) Prerequisite: Biology, Algebra I & Geometry 

 

Physics is a continued introduction of topics first presented during the second semester of physical science. The topics include, but are not limited to Newton's Laws of Motion, vectors, acceleration, waves, and electricity. The underlying concepts presented in physics concern energy and its changes. Laboratory exercises are a major part of this course. The assumption that every student is thoroughly familiar with the metric system and capable of using it in the laboratory. Physics involved basic trigonometry principles, so two years of algebra are required and geometry is strongly suggested.      

 

 

Conceptual Physics 1 Credit (11-12) Prerequisite Biology, Algebra I & Geometry

 

Physics is a continued introduction of topics first presented during the second semester of physical science. The topics include, but are not limited to Newton's Laws of Motion, vectors, acceleration, waves, and electricity. The underlying concepts presented in physics concern energy and its changes. Laboratory exercises are a major part of this course. This course will help students become more familiar with the metric system and capable of using it in the laboratory. Physics involved basic trigonometry principles, so two years of algebra are required and geometry is strongly suggested.     

                                                                                                                 

Human Anatomy (Physiology) 1 credit (11-12) Prerequisites: Biology & Chemistry

 

Human physiology consists of a study of all 10 systems of the human body. The course involves both anatomy (structure) and physiology (function) of the body's organs and systems. The class is primarily geared to college bound students but average students are not discouraged from taking this course. The information in it is helpful to everyone. Many labs in the class concern blood, food, and genetics.

 

Forensic Laboratory Science 1 credit (10-12) Prerequisite Biology and Algebra I

 

Forensic Laboratory Science courses involve the application of biological, chemical, and physical science principles to data and physical evidence related to evidence collection and analysis. The courses focus on the application of scientific knowledge and scientific principles to collect, preserve, and analyze the evidence in a laboratory setting. Topics may include but are not limited to entomology, forensic anthropology, serology, and fingerprinting.

 

Genetics- ½ credit (10-12). Prerequisite B- in Biology

 

Genetics courses provide students with an understanding of general concepts concerning genes, heredity, and variation of organisms. Course topics typically include chromosomes, the structure of DNA and RNA molecules, and dominant and recessive inheritance and may also include lethal alleles, epistasis and hypostasis, and polygenic inheritance. This course is a semester long course, not a full year course.

 

Meteorology- 1 credit (10-12)

 

Meteorology courses examine the properties of the earth’s atmosphere. Topics usually include atmospheric layering, changing pressures, winds, water vapor, air masses, fronts, temperature changes and weather forecasting.

 

 

Social Science Department

 

A total of three social studies credits are required for graduation. Students must take American History, World History, World Geography, and Government making up 2.5 of the required social studies credits. Students can choose from a list of social studies electives to fulfill the other .5 credit.

 

World Geography ½ credit (R; 9-10)

 

Geography is the study of our physical environment and its impact upon our history and life-styles. By studying the geography and cultures of the earth and its regions, you will become better able to understand the nature of the world and the events that take place in it. Geography concepts and skills help us to learn more about why we live and behave as we do. Geography helps to explain how our environment has affected us in the past and how it continues to affect us today.

   

World History I ½ credit (R; 9-12)

 

Today's news media allows us to see and read about many nations and kinds of people with different forms of government. Television programs show quarrels among people and wars between nations. How did people get to be this way? For the answer, we must look at world history. World history is the fascinating story of how people lived, what they did and what they said. It focuses on how they tried to solve their problems and what ideas and customs they developed. Study begins with the Stone Age and works through the Roman Empire.

 

Modern World History ½ credit (9-12)

 

Today's news media allows us to see and read about many nations and kinds of people with different forms of government. Television programs show quarrels among people and wars between nations. How did people get to be this way? For the answer, we must look at world history. World history is the fascinating story of how people lived, what they did and what they said. It focuses on how they tried to solve their problems and what ideas and customs they developed. This course covers the history of the Middle Ages through modern times, with emphasis on WWI and WWII.

 

US  History 1 credit (R- 11)

 

US History is an overview of our country's development beginning with early European explorations and discoveries. From there it branches into the actual colonization and the hardships people endured. American History covers information to the present day.

 

Materials covered include:

1) Building the European colonization and changing ways of American life.

2) Winning independence.

3) Building a new nation.

5) The nation being torn apart by Civil War.

7) The rise of industrialism in the US and the period of imperialism.

8) WWI and the transition into the Great Depression.

9) Regrouping with the New Deal after the stock market crash and the US in WWII.

10) Challenge of the New Era.

                                                                                                                                                 

American Government ½ credit (R- 12)

 

This course is an examination of the background of our government, how it functions, and the responsibilities of our citizens. The students study the modern political and economic systems: how our country developed a Constitution and the struggles of a young nation, and political participation (voting, pressure groups, and political parties). The students will study the three main branches of government, and how each operates.

 

Materials covered includes:

1) Foundation of the American Governmental System

2) Citizenship and Civil Rights and Responsibilities

3) Branches of Government

4) Types of Governments and Economic Systems

5) Civic Participation

                                                                                                                                                 

Contemporary World Issues ½ credit (10-12)

 

This course is developed to give students an understanding of the events and incidents occurring in our world, nation, state, and community. The students will realize those contemporary happenings, regardless of how near or far; have an effect on us all. The relevance of current issues and the significance of keeping oneself informed and up-to-date in today's information age is studied. Students will also explore the media, and their influence on public opinion. News magazines, television news programs, newspapers, various online sources all are part of the text    

                                                                                                                                               

Psychology ½ credit (11-12)

 

This course covers the principles and applications of the subject of psychology form a personal-adjustment approach. The areas covered are psychological methods, understanding human development and behavior, principles of learning and thinking, perception and emotion, stress and personality disturbances.

                                                                                                                               

Sociology ½ credit (10-12)

 

Sociology is about people-how they act, and interact in both their everyday lives and under unusual circumstances as described by the different major sociological perspectives. Sociology looks at people in groups, and helps the student understand why people do what they do, like what they like, and think what they think.

 

 

South Dakota History ½ credit (9-12)

 

This course is a study of the historical processes of how events, people, and nature shaped and altered South Dakota's history. It will help students gain an appreciation of South Dakota's place in the scheme of American history. The class is offered to help develop an understanding and appreciation for those who helped build our state.

 

US Wars/Military Conflicts ½ credit or 1 credit (10-12)

U.S. Wars and Military Conflicts courses focus on the study of one or more wars and major military conflicts in which the United States had a significant role. These courses concentrate on one of many topics related to war, including the causes; U.S. involvement; and social, political, and economic effects. Specific wars may include the Revolutionary War, American Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Gulf War, or other contemporary military conflicts.

 

Particular Topics in US History I & II- ½ credit each (10-12)

These courses examine particular topics and events in U.S. History. Such as particular time periods in the history of the United States, or significant events that shaped America or made profound impacts. Generally these lessons will include events that propelled America into making major decisions or impacted the lives of the American people to a great extent.

 
Computer Department

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Foundations of Technology ½ credit (9-12) 

 

Students will study some ethics and usage of computers in our changing society, study cost of today's hardware and software needs, and study current operating systems, hardware, and software. The student will learn to identify the general usage of technology, software, and applications. Utilizing that knowledge, this course will cover topics such as, but not be limited to, word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, operating systems, Internet browsers, search engines, databases, preventive maintenance and security, digital literacy, netiquette and citizenship. This course expands the student’s skills, knowledge and confidence in various forms of software platforms and applications.  Students will also explore with photography, web development, digital presentations, and GPS/GIS. 

 

Advanced Computer Applications ½ credit (10-12) Prerequisite Foundations of Technology

 

Students will review Microsoft Word, Excel, and Access. Students will learn to use Google sites to edit webpages. Students will spend a large portion of the semester editing the school webpage. Students will learn to make a multimedia presentation using the Internet, digital cameras, scanners, photo editing software, Photo Story and PowerPoint.Students will explore with video creation and editing using movie maker.  Students will also learn to create a production using green screen technology. Students will be exposed to computer programing using ozobots, code academy, and other online coding programs.

 

Graphic Design 1 (Pagemaking) - 1 credit (10-12)

 

Students will learn the Legal and Ethical Issues, Career Opportunities, Fundamentals of Computer Graphics.  Students will learn photography, journalism, and organizational skills needed to create the school newsletter and the annual yearbook.  Most of the year will be spent taking photos, creating, and publishing spreads for the yearbook. 

 

Journalistic Design (Pagemaking 2) - 1 credit (10-12) Prerequisite - Graphic Design 1

 

Journalistic Design gives students experience and knowledge in all forms of mixed media and content. Multimedia presentations combine text, graphics, animation, images and sound from a wide range of media, such as films, newspapers, magazines, online information, television, and videos.  Students will be responsible for taking on a leadership role in the yearbook class.  Students will be responsible for creating yearbook pages, newsletters, programs, and the end of the season videos. 

 

Introduction to Arts, Audio-Visual Technology and Communications - 1 credit (10-12)

 

Introduction to Arts, A/V Technology & Communication course enables students to understand and critically evaluate the role of media in society. Course content includes: investigation of visual images, printed material and audio segments as tools of information, entertainment and propaganda; improvement of presentation and evaluative skills in relation to mass media; recognition of various techniques for delivery of a particular message; and, in some cases, creation of a media product. The course may concentrate on a particular medium within the selected pathway(s). Students will be responsible for adding video, audio, and text advertisements for the schools live stream.  Students will be responsible for setting up, streaming, and taking down the live stream for local sporting events. 

Students will be required to attend all home activities where they will put in the hours for the class, no time will be used during the school day for this class.

 

Broadcast Technology - 1 credit (10-12) - Prerequisite - Intro to Art and A/V Technology and Communication

 

Broadcast Technology explores the ever-changing world of video production.  Students will gain insight into careers in broadcast journalism.  Students will gain industry experience by producing the live sports streams of all home events.  Students will learn to create video and audio ads and incorporate them into a live production.

Students will be required to attend all home activities where they will put in the hours for the class, no time will be used during the school day for this class. 

 

 

Photography 1 - 1 credit (9-12)

 

In Photography 1, students will be taught industry -relevant technical skills and have the opportunity to work with a variety of technology, including digital cameras, design software, and editing tools to stage, shoot, and present professional-grade images.  Students will evaluate and critique photographic work and investigate the history of photography. 

 

Computer Science Principles ½ (9-12)

 

This course covers a diverse selection of topics including, but not limited to: Human computer interaction, problem solving, web design, introduction to programming, computing and data analysis, and robotics. This course loosely follows the Exploring Computer Science curriculum at www.exploringcs.org. Although there is no prerequisite, the student should have a fair amount of maturity and the ability to work independently as well as in a team.

 

 

Fine Arts Department

 

One credit of Fine Arts is required for graduation. This can include Band, Vocal Music, Art, Music Appreciation, and Film and Stage Appreciation.

                                                                                                                                               

Band 1 credit per year (9-12)

 

Required Ensembles of Band Students:

 

Marching Band - Is a 7-12 grade performing group. The marching band will perform at Czech Days and Memorial Day. This group may compete in the parade.  Preparation and performances are graded projects of the class.  Because this ensemble is such a visible representative of the school, a proper sense of conduct and discipline will be maintained at all times.

 

Concert Band - The concert band is the main performing group and is the main educational goal.  The Bon Homme High School Concert Band has a tradition of excellence, and performs 4 major concerts during the year (Patriotic, Christmas, Midwinter [Music in our schools], and Pops) Membership in these organizations is based on your history and skill in instrumental music. You must have been playing an instrument prior to the 7th grade and shown some proficiency at it. Grading is based on the level of the student’s ability as well as attendance at all “Band” functions. Individual lessons are encouraged and sometimes required.

 

Pep Band - During the sports season at BHHS, the band makes periodic appearances at home games to help boost school spirit and entertain the spectators. All members of the band have a responsibility to see that they are available to play their instruments at the assigned home games.

 

Elective Ensembles of Band

 

Jazz Band - The Jazz Band is a select ensemble of our best musicians. The group is comprised of 2 alto saxes, 2 tenor saxes, 1 baritone sax, 4 trumpets, 4 trombones, 1 bass, 1 guitar, 2 keyboard players, and 2 percussionists. Auditions for the group are usually held one month prior to the school year. Performances for this group may include:  Variety Show, Mid Winter (MIOS), and community events/fundraisers. 

 

All State Band - The South Dakota All Sate Band is a select group of high school musicians chosen from across the state. Auditions for this group are held in January and are comprised of a prepared solo, major-minor-chromatic scales, sight-reading, and written exam over various music terms. If selected, the student would attend a three-day rehearsal festival held in one of South Dakota’s major cities as well as perform in a Saturday evening concert.  Preparations for this audition begin on the first day of school in September.

 

Large Group Contest - is held in Vermillion each year. This contest allows the band to rank itself among other similar organizations in the region. This is very important for group growth and musicianship.

 

Small Group Contest- will include sectional ensembles and solos, section leaders and students. Auditioning for All State Band must perform a solo at contest. Others may volunteer to perform a solo at contest to receive points towards lettering.

 

Art I 1 credit (9-12) offered alternating years with Art II depending on enrollment

 

This class is a full year elective and open to all students with a desire to express themselves through visual arts, explore new medium, and learn new techniques. It will focus on improving skills on basic art processes including drawing, painting, sculpting, and crafts. Students will be required to complete art projects that are both two- dimensional and three-dimensional. Students will also have the opportunity to view and critique works of some master artists.

 

Art II 1 credit (10-12) prerequisite Art I; offered according to enrollment

 

Art II is a full year elective. This class is an extension of skills, techniques, and mediums from Art I. Projects will generally be longer and more in-depth.  A mastery of basic drawing skills will be necessary. Art I or Art II will be offered according to number of students interested.

 

Intro to Theatre (formerly Stage and Film Appreciation)  ½ credit (9-12)

 

This course will meet for one semester. Studies will include units covering the basic elements of stage and film practices. That may include, but is not limited to: theatre and film history; technical elements such as scenery, costuming, make-up, lighting; basic film techniques; and acting and directing practices. Critical analysis will be incorporated. Activities may include, but are not limited to: note taking, tests, quizzes, written responses, class participation, viewing, and reading. The class may count as ½ Fine Arts credit or elective credit.

                                               

Music Appreciation ½ credit (9-12)

 

Music Appreciation will consist of an abbreviated history of Western Music and how it relates to civilization as we know it. It will teach students to listen, evaluate, and identify musical forms and ideas. Students will be exposed to many genre of music and learn appropriate behavior for these different concert settings. Finally, the students will be able to identify 3 major forms of Pop music and trace the history of the same pop music in America.

                                                                                                                                                 

Choir 1 credit per year (9-12) prerequisite: Vocal Audition

 

All students will audition for a spot in the HS choir.

Students will  learn and apply principles of vocal production and performance.  This includes such things as proper breathing technique, tone production, diction, blend, concert etiquette, voice health, sight singing,  music history, and theory. Membership in mixed chorus will include performances from the following list:  Variety Show, Veteran’s Day Program,  Christmas Concert, Music in our Schools Month Concert, Region I Small Group/Solo Contest, Region I Large Group Contest, and the Spring Concert as well as other performances  Students will have opportunities to try out for honor choirs, All-State Chorus, collegiate honor ensembles, and music leadership workshops. Outside professionals from the high school and collegiate ranks may be invited to come and work with the ensemble from time to time. 

 

Business Department

                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Personal Finance ½ credit (R- 12)

 

The required course is designed to prepare students for the financial climate that we live in today not only in this country but in a world economy. It will concentrate on helping students understand how this country’s financial system works and the responsibilities that they have in administering and monitoring their own financial situation.

The course highlights different careers and how to find a career that is suitable to you. It explains work laws and rules that every employee must follow, including taxes, insurance, and benefits. The course then switches to budgeting and record keeping, checking and savings accounts, how to use them and keep them in balance. The final section of the course discusses credit. It discusses the dangers of not using credit correctly and the benefits of credit in our society. The course concludes with a unit on decision-making. Financial responsibility begins and ends with proper decision making in regard to your own finances.

 

Foreign Language Department

  

Spanish I 1 credit (10-12)  Online Only Course

 

This is a beginning course in Spanish emphasizing vocabulary development, pronunciation, fundamental grammar usage, basic conversation, and studies of cultural interest. Memorization and daily work are essential for foreign language study. Lessons involve reading, oral, and written experiences. Spanish is an asset to any student wishing to fulfill a foreign language college requirement. It is strongly urged that though taking this course have an above average command of the English language.

                                                                                                                                                 

Spanish II 1 credit (10-12) prerequisite of a C or better in Spanish I Online Only Course

 

Spanish I is a prerequisite for this course. A second course in Spanish continues vocabulary development, but places greater emphasis on oral and written proficiency. Conversational Spanish has greater emphasis in the lessons, although the lesson format remains essentially unchanged. Cultural studies are continued.

                                 

Technology Department

 

Intro to Tech Education (Formally known as Woodworking I) 1 credit or ½ credit (9-12)

 

Woodworking projects will be designed and built in the shop during this course. Many other technology skills, and Industrial Arts skills will be taught in the shop setting. A project or multiple projects will be built during the class. The objectives of technology education are based on the assumption that a technologically literate person will be competent to solve technological problems and make wise selections of products and services of industry. The student will safely use tools, machines, materials and processes of industry.

 

Intro to Drafting and Design 1 credit or ½ credit (9-12)

 

People with careers in design and pre-construction create our future. They turn a concept into a set of plans whether for a component, a system, or a building. Their plans guide other construction or manufacturing professionals as they continue the building process. This course will expose students to the American Design Drafting Association (ADDA) Apprentice standards in both mechanical and architectural drafting. The desire for this course is for the students to receive industry based training at the basic level before taking either the Mechanical or Architectural drafting courses.            

                                               

Technical Drafting and Design (Formally Known as Woodworking II) 1 credit or ½ credit (9-12) Prerequisite: Intro to Drafting and Design    
                                                                                          

Students will be given the opportunity to learn and experience computer drafting skills. Students will also learn and use mechanical drafting and manual drafting skills.  People with careers in design and pre-construction create our future. They turn a concept into a set of plans whether it's a component, a system, or a building. Their plans guide other construction or manufacturing professionals as they continue the building process. Mechanical Drafting and Design will expose students to the American Design Drafting Association (ADDA)standards in mechanical drafting.

 

Introduction to Energy/Power ½ credit (9-12)

 

Energy/Power courses focus on one or several aspects of energy and power in transportation and work. Course content may include various sources of energy and their use in society (for example, characteristics, availability, conversion, storage, environmental impact, and socioeconomic aspects of various energy sources); principles involved in various means of energy transfer, such as electricity/electronics, hydraulics, pneumatics, heat transfer, and wind/nuclear/solar energies; and the transmission and control of power through mechanical or electrical devices such as motors and engines.

 

Career Experience Courses:

 

Youth Internship 1 credits (12) Prerequisite Employability         

   

2 periods for 1 semester or 1 period for 2 semesters for a combination of one credit

 

Students who enroll in Youth Internship must start looking for businesses to work with.  The individual should choose businesses that interest them and the potential career path he/she wants to pursue post high school. The student will need to contact the business, introduce himself/herself, and share why he/she is interested in their business. They also need to as the business if they would be willing to take on a YI student, discuss the expectations, and the students daytime availability. The instructor will help students find contact information and offer suggestions, but each student needs to make the contact. During this time he/she will engage in career development and work-based learning activities. Individuals from a variety of careers will participate in seminars and panels with students. The student will keep a daily log, record of earning, expenses, i.e. a training plan. The employer and teacher will share supervision and evaluation. Students interested in education will be placed within the district and will have the option of taking the course one semester for two periods a day or two semesters for one period a day for one credit. Beginning in the Fall 2019 only SENIORS will be eligible to take Youth Internship; and will only be eligible for 2 semesters (unless special circumstances arise). Students cannot work with family. Only one student may work with a sponsor per period.

 

Employability- ½ credit (9-12) Prerequisite for Youth Internship- Requirement for all Sophomores, also required for any Juniors who hope to take Youth Internship as a Senior

 

Employability Skills courses help students match their interests and aptitudes to career options with a focus on using employment information effectively, acquiring and improving job-seeking and interview skills, composing job applications and resumes, and learning the skills needed to remain in and advance within the workplace. Course content may also include consumer education and personal money management topics.

 

                                               

Agriculture Education Department

 

Agriscience  ½ credit (suggested 9) 1st semester

 

The class will focus on an introduction to the FFA including: history, opportunities, programs, events, contests, parliamentary procedure, and public speaking. Basic introduction to crop science and dairy science will be taught.  The remainder of the first semester will be spent on tool safety and operation with students creating a project by the end of the first semester. 

 

Fundamental Animal Science ½ credit (9-12) 2nd semester

 

Units and topics covered will include history of animal science, digestion, reproduction, genetics, feed rations, beef production, swine productions, horse production, sheep and wool, dairy, poultry and other various topics related to animal science. Students will be expected to work hard in class, come prepared, and complete all assignments on time and to the best of their ability. 

                                                                                                                                                 

Fundamental Ag Mechanics (Ag Engineering) .5 (12)  credit Prerequisite – Agriscience . 1st Semester

 

Fundamental Ag Mechanics is offered to help students build basic knowledge and skills in the area of agricultural mechanics, along with soft skills necessary for careers in the Agriculture, Food and Natrual Resources sector. Topics covered in this course include: electricity, engines and ag technology. More substantial knowledge on the individual topics comes in advanced courses such as Ag Systems Technology, Ag Metal Fabrication, and Fundamental Ag Structures. Classroom and laboratory content may be enhanced by utilizing appropriate equipment and technology. Algebra, Geometry, English and human relation skills will be reinforced in this course. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are school-based enterprises and field trips.

 

Fundamental Ag Structures (Ag Engineering) .5 (12) Prerequisite- Agriscience. 2nd Semester

 

Fundamental Ag Structures Technology offers basic skills needed to be successful in the agricultural structures industry, such as the safe use of hand tools and power tools, drafting of structural plans, concrete and electrical fundamentals. The course will also incorporate soft skills necessary for careers in the Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources sector. South Dakota continues to face a shortage of certified electricians, plumbers and contractors, leaving these careers in high demand. classroom and laboratory content may be enhanced by utilizing appropriate equipment and technology. Algebra, geometry, trigonometry, english and human relations skills will be reinforced in this course. Work based learning strategies appropriate for this course are school-based enterprises and field trips. this class is reinforced through FFA and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) programs, the Ag Mechanics Career Development Event and related Proficiency Experience or Internship Project.

                                                                                                                                 

Agribusiness ½ credit (11-12) 

 

Students will learn basic farm and ranch management skills. Subject matter covered will include cash flow statements, whole farm budget, assets, liabilities, farm planning, depreciation, taxes, marketing, commodities, annuities, and other topics. Students will also choose a farm commodity and track its movement for two weeks and complete a detailed report on their findings. Students will be expected to work hard in class, come to class prepared, and complete all assignments on time and to the best of their ability.

 

Ag Power Technology (Small Gas Engines) ½ credit (10-12)

 

Students will learn about small gasoline engines and various parts. Engine theory and basic principles will be taught first before students begin work on an engine. An engine will be provided for students to disassemble and then reassemble after naming all the internal parts. Students will be required to bring in their own small engine to work on for the rest of the semester. Students will be expected to work hard in class, come to class prepared, and complete all assignments on time and to the best of their ability.

 

 

Ag Metal Fabrication Technology (Welding) ½ credit (11-12)

 

Students will learn welding principles, concepts, safety, and understand how welding works before beginning to actually weld. Safety exams will be given to students and must pass before work may begin. A guest speaker will talk to the class on the dangers of welder’s burn and foreign bodies entering the eye. Students will learn how to weld with MIG, arc, and oxyacetylene equipment. A packet of assignments will be given to the students describing various welds that will be done. Welds include t-joints, butt joints, lap joints, edge joints, corner joints, and pipe. Brazing, cutting, and safety with oxyacetylene equipment will also be covered. Safety is a must for students enrolled in this class. Students will be expected to work hard in class, come to class prepared, and complete all assignments on time and to the best of their ability.

                                                                                                                               

Advanced Horticulture ½ credit (9-12)

 

Students will learn various aspects involved with horticulture, arboriculture, aquaculture, and others. Specific topics covered will be plant structure and function, soils, fertilizers, propagation, pruning, lawn care, landscape design, fruit and vegetables, tree care, flower design, and arrangement. Students will be required to make PowerPoint presentations on various horticulture topics of their choice. Students will also identify trees by leaf, bark, and shape. Students will be expected to work hard in class, come to class prepared, and complete all assignments on time and to the best of their ability.             

                                                                                                                 

Natural Resources ½ credit (9-12)

 

People depend on natural resources. Regions, cultures, nations and societies and shaped by how people use land, water, plants, and wildlife. South Dakota’s natural resources- minerals, forests, ranges, wetlands, lakes, rivers, soils, along with all connected domestic and native plant and animal communities- play an important role in its economic health, including mining, agriculture, outdoor recreation, and tourism. The large and small ecosystems that make up the environment are complex. Fundamental Natural REsources provides students with an overview of the plants natural resource systems, along with examining those resources unique to South Dakota. Students will explore and develop a basic understanding of how the systems relate to one another. Students will explore and develop a basic understanding of how the systems relate to one another. Students will consider the roles people play in and the occupations related to,  managing, using, protecting and conserving natural resources. Classroom and laboratory content should be enhanced by utilizing up to date equipment and technology, such as geographic information system (GIS) software. Biology, statistics, algebra, english and human relations skills will be reinforced throughout this course.

                                                                                                                                               

Advanced Natural Resources ½ credit (9-12)

 

This course will be an extension of natural resources. More in-depth topics, assignments, reports, and discussion will take place. Subject matter covered will include environmental issues, taxidermy with anatomy, map reading and orienteering, game processing, Missouri River issues, issues specific to South Dakota, U.S. energy needs and meeting the demand, exploration of public lands in the U.S., and other subjects students would like to cover. The expectations of the students will be greater during this class.

                                                                                                                                                 

Food Science ½ credit (11-12)

 

Students will develop skills and competencies in the areas of food and people, nutrition, food preparation skills, food safety, etiquette, and kitchen sanitation. Students will create PowerPoint presentations on various topics affecting food, diseases, and other issues. Major projects throughout the semester will be meal planning with a budget, preparing a meal for guest eaters and various group projects. Students will also learn about meat, dairy, grains, vegetables, and fruits. Students will be expected to work hard in class, come to class prepared, and complete all assignments on time and to the best of their ability.

 

Ag Processing- ½ credit (9-12)

 

Agricultural Processing courses impart the knowledge and skills needed to bring animal and plant products to market. They may cover a wide variety of topics, including care and maintenance of animals or plants, quality selection and preservation, equipment care and sanitation, government regulations, and marketing and consumer trends. Agricultural Processing courses may present an overview of agricultural processing or may specialize in particular types of products.

 

 

 

Physical Education Department

 

Health/Physical Education 1 Credit (R-9)

 

Physical Education courses provide students with knowledge, experience, and an opportunity to develop skills in more than one of the following sports or activities: team sports, individual/dual sports, recreational sports, and fitness/conditioning activities. Health topics covered may include personal health, nutrition, stress management, drug/alcohol abuse prevention, disease prevention, and consumer health issues. Safety and first aid, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automatic external defibrillator (AED) training will be addressed as well.

 

Weight training- ½ credit (10-12)- will be a limit of 10 or less students to accommodate space in the weight room.

 

Weight Training courses help students develop knowledge and skills with free weights and universal stations while emphasizing safety and proper body positioning; they may include other components such as anatomy and conditioning.

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                 

 

 


2020 Graduation Requirement Check Off Chart

 

Mark off credits as students completes them to keep track of your student’s progress. A total of 22 credits are required to graduate.

 

English/ Language Arts (4 credits)

     □         Freshman Literature (English I, 1st semester) .5

□              Speech (English I, 2nd semester) .5

□  □         English II

□  □         American Literature ( English III or AP English III)

□  □         English IV or AP English IV

 

Mathematics (3 credits)

□  □         Algebra I

□  □         Mathematics _______________________________           

□  □        Mathematics _______________________________           

 

Science (3 credits)

□  □         Biology

□  □         Lab Science _______________________________            

□  □         Lab Science _______________________________            

 

Social Studies (3 credits)

□              World Geography .5

□  □         US History 1

□              Government .5

□              World History .5

□              Social studies electives 1 credit _______________________________              

 

CTE or Foreign Language (1 Credit)

□              _______________________________ 

□              _______________________________ 

 

Fine Arts (1 credit)

□              Fine Art _______________________________   

□              Fine Art  _______________________________  

 

PE/Health (1 credit)

□              Physical Education/Health

 

Personal Finance (1/2 credit)

□              Personal Finance    

 

Bon Homme H.S. electives (6 ½ credits)

□              _______________________________                  □              ___________________________

□              _______________________________                  □              ___________________________

□              _______________________________                  □              ___________________________

□              _______________________________                  □              ___________________________

□              _______________________________                  □              ___________________________

□              _______________________________                  □              ___________________________

 

Additional requirements for qualification for Regent Scholar Curriculum/Opportunity Scholarship

You must have: one year of foreign language, a total of 4 years of Math, Algebra I, and above, a total of 4 years of Lab Science, a GPA of 3.0 or higher, all required courses must have a C or better, and you must have an ACT of 24 or better.

 

Advanced Endorsement: _____________________

Advanced Career Endorsement:________________

Advanced Honors Endorsement:_______________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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